You now have an even easier option when moving your mastery scores to your gradebook with new functionality in MasteryConnect. Export Mastery is perfect for you if you’re moving towards standards-based report cards, want your gradebook to reflect the overall mastery of standards, or are looking for an easier way to convert mastery levels to grades. See how this new time-saving feature can be used in your classroom!
 

Communicate Student Performance

If you’re a primary educator, this feature can help you produce standard-level report cards so you can clearly communicate what students know and don’t know to parents.
 

Convert Mastery Levels into Grades

If you’re a secondary educator, you might use this feature to convert mastery scores into letter grades to produce a traditional report card.
 

See How It’s Done

As seen below, you can now select Export Mastery from the drop-down standards menu in your Tracker. This will copy all mastery levels in your Tracker so you can easily paste that data into a separate gradebook. Once you have your gradebook or excel sheet open, push the F8 function key on your computer to paste your mastery scores in the same order as your Tracker.

 

Ready to start exporting mastery scores? Read our Help Center article here for step-by-step instructions or contact your Regional Education Consultant for more information.

 

At MasteryConnect, we believe that assessments should be used to improve instruction and learning—but that doesn’t mean they can’t be fun. In fact, getting creative with how you assess your students can significantly improve the assessment culture at your school and reduce the stress associated with “testing”. Keep reading to learn more about five of our favorite formative assessment strategies that can be used for any subject or grade level.
 

#1 Commit and Toss

This activity is sure to get students more engaged in class discussions with an interactive take on answering prompts.

  • Ask your students to respond in writing to a question or prompt.
  • Crumple up the responses and have students toss them across the room or into an empty box.
  • Ask students to go around the room and collect one of the responses (students should notify the teacher if they receive their own).
  • Ask each student to comment on the response they received. They can elaborate, agree, disagree, or add to the idea to engage in the class discussion.

 

#2 List, Group, Label

This activity provides a way for students to identify relationships between words and concepts.

  • Pick a topic, any topic.
  • Have students brainstorm and list words or ideas related to that topic.
  • Break students up into small groups and ask them to group the words by theme or concept.
  • Ask students to discuss their reasoning behind how they grouped the words and label each group based on their findings.

 

#3 Agreement Circles

Encourage your students to pick a side and defend their argument with this interactive exercise!

  • Ask students to form a large circle.
  • Read a statement to them aloud, then give them a few moments to decide if they agree or disagree with the statement.
  • Ask students to move to the center of the circle if they agree with the statement, and stay on the outside if they disagree.
  • Split students up into small groups containing equal proportions with differing points of view on the subject and give them a few minutes to defend their views.
  • Now that they’ve had a chance to discuss both sides of the argument, ask them to come back to the center and reposition themselves in the big circle according to their current opinion.

 

#4 Think-Pair-Share

Students reflect on a question, reading, or task, then write a response down to share and debate with a partner. This strategy can be paired with the Jigsaw strategy in which students read different writings and reflect or sum up what they read, then pair with a partner to compare, compile, or contrast these writings.

  • Students respond to a question or task by thinking about it and writing their responses.
  • Students pair up to share their responses. Together, partners decide on a best response or they collaborate to create a shared response.
  • Student pairs then share their responses in a whole-class discussion.
  • Repeat steps two and three as many times as the lesson calls for and time allows. Though once is adequate to complete the activity, repeating the activity (optional) with new partners may be ideal in some situations.

 

#5 Three-Two-One

This can be used as a comprehension exercise or an exit ticket. Ask students the following questions:

  • What are three things you learned?
  • What are two questions you still have?
  • What is one thing you found interesting?

This exercise encourages students to reflect on what they just learned, while also showing educators the information that stuck and the areas that could use more attention.

 
Have a favorite formative assessment strategy of your own? Share your ideas with us on our social channels!